St. John Chrysostom Church

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

St. John Chrysostom Church

Founded 1931

Diocese: Albanian Archdiocese

Deanery: Mid-Atlantic Deanery

Address

237 N 17th St
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103-1292

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

http://www.stjohnsphila.org

Office: 215-563-0979

Parish Contacts

Rev. Thomas (Brooks) Ledford
Rector
237 N 17th St
Philadelphia, PA 19103-1292
Home: 215-563-0979

Lay Leadership

Donna Dimitri
Lay Contact
Diane Lescas
Choir Director
Steve Coraluzzi
Sunday School Director

Directions

From Route 95 North or South
Get onto Route 676 [Vine Street Expressway] heading West, get off at the North 15th Street exit, go South on North 15th Street, turn right onto Vine Street, turn left onto North 17th Street [one way], St. John’s is on your left.

Interstate 76 [Schuykill expressway] to Interstate 676 [Vine Street
expressway]

Get off at Broad Street exit, left onto Broad Street North, go three blocks, turn left onto Wood Street, turn left onto North 15th Street, turn right onto Vine Street, turn left onto North 17th Street [one way], St. John’s is on your left.

Interstate 76 [Schuykill expressway] to Springarden exit
Go to Art Museum and Benjamin Franklin Parkway, turn right onto Logan Circle/Logan Square, after you pass in front of Sts. Peter and Paul RC Cathedral turn right on Vine Street, go one block to 17th Street, turn right [it is one way south], St. John’s is on your left.

Schedule of Services

English is used during all Divine Services with a touch of Albanian in most Services.

10:00 AM Divine Liturgy (refreshments follow).
Sunday Morning

7:00 PM Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts [followed by potluck dinner and discussion]
Wednesday Evenings in Great Lent

Confessions are heard before or after Divine Liturgy or by appointment. Contact Father Brooks for additional information.
Confessions

Please contact Father Brooks at the church office, 215-563-0979 or via email fr.brooks@stjohnsphila.org for information about the services, baptisms, marriages, hospital or home visitations.

Parish Background

In the early 1900’s, thousands of Albanians emigrated from their homeland to the United States.  As a result St. John Chrysostom Albanian Orthodox Church was established in its present building in 1931 through the efforts of Fr. Mark Kondili.  Prior to that the faithful had worshipped in a Serbian Orthodox Church and even a saloon.  The present structure, built in 1848 was designed by noted architect, Napolean LeBrun who also had designed St. Peter and Paul’s Cathedral across the street.  Originally St. John’s was the “Episcopal Church of the Epiphany”.  In 1947, after incorporation, the Orthodox Community bought the building for $25,000.

In the early 50’s the annual budget was around $2000.  In 1957 English was used once a month.  During the 60’s continued growth and activity—the Sunday School had 100 students—marked St. John’s as a “community” Church.  In the 70’s the “Franklin Town” neighborhood restructuring stripped away the private homes forcing the parish to face new challenges.  In 1990, after years of Communism and the brutal suppression of the Orthodox Faith, Albanian emigration to the United States and the Philadelphia area presented St. John’s with new families.  Seemingly overnight, the aging congregation doubled with young Albanian families.

Since 1931 twelve priests have served St. John’s which is a parish of the Albanian Archdiocese [Boston] within the OCA [Orthodox Church in America] under Metropolitan Herman.

Today St. John’s is very much a “family parish” with approximately 200 family units.  The last several years have shown an upward trend in Sunday School to 70 this year.  The mission thrust exists on three fronts:  the present families, the immediate neighborhood and the “New American-Albanian families.”  Although its families live throughout the Greater Philadelphia area, St. John Chrysostom Albanian Orthodox Church is a community committed to the witness of God:  Father, Son and Holy Spirit and the fullness of the Orthodox Faith in the City of Philadelphia.